SHEET VINYL

Invented in the 1930s, sheet vinyl is made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) resin along with various additives and comes in continuous, large, flexible sheets. It is sometimes called linoleum, but vinyl and linoleum are actually two different types of resilient flooring that share many characteristics. They both belong to the same class of “resilient flooring” because their material isn’t rigid but can instead bend and roll.

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When to Choose Sheet Vinyl

When it comes to waterproof flooring, sheet vinyl is second to none. Not only do you have a wide variety of flooring patterns to choose from, all relatively inexpensive and each creating a different look and feel for your space, you also get a durable flooring ideal for water prone areas of the home, such as the kitchen, bathroom and laundry. Since water prone areas will require greater maintenance, you will appreciate that sheet vinyl is exceptionally easy to clean and it continues looking as if it is new. After your floor has been swept free of grit and loose dirt, use a damp mop to keep it in top condition.

Installation

Sheet vinyl also ranks highly for ease of installation. It can be installed over concrete, wooden or any other base flooring with the help of rubber based adhesives. Often these will be in the form of a sticky backing you can simply peel off which is relatively simple enough for you to do yourself.

When Not to Choose Sheet Vinyl

Sheet vinyl flooring can become yellow with age. There are a number of causes but exposure to direct sunlight and dirt that is trapped beneath a wax layer on a vinyl sheet are common culprits. High-quality vinyl floors are, however, resistant to this type of discoloration. Owing to the materials used in its manufacture, vinyl sheet will sometimes emit various levels of Volatile Organic Chemicals, or VOCs into the air for a period after initial installation. These substances pose a health risk to anyone who is exposed to them. To counteract these effects, make sure that space is well ventilated for several days after its installation.